garlic

From Unique Fine Foods we have a green harisssa paste from their UniqueArabia range to sample and review. I have to say I have tried many red harissa pastes but never a green one before so I was interested to see if there was any real difference.

Unique Foods Green Harissa Paste

On the label “A delicious hot paste, a little goes a long way! why not try spreading over chicken before cooking or stir into a dip to add a kick” The label is that of a standard cooking condiment easily stored with your other spices. The jar is mini at only 90g but most harissa pastes are of a similar size so this is not a negative

Ingredients: Green peppers, green chilli (41.5%) olive oil, garlic, salt, spinach, caraway seeds, coriander, mint, lactic acid.

My first thoughts, is that’s a very precise amount of chilli listed in the ingredients, will the 0.5% make a difference? On opening the jar you are greeted with a combination of fresh aromas as if this was recently blended but they soon die away to the predicted processed dullness that is necessary to keep products like this alive. With the list of ingredients of was expecting a bouquet of flavours to hit my taste buds. Unfortunately not much happened, not wishing to do the product injustice I experimented for a couple of weeks adding to lamb kebabs, basting chicken and creating dips alongside bread and olives. I have to say this greatly improved the flavours. I believe it would also not be too overpowering on a nice fresh white baked fish. As for heat, I couldn’t detect any at all, not even gentle background warmth you generally get on consumer products. So this is not one for the chilli heads but one for the experimental cooks.

Unfortunately the Unique Fine Foods website is built and appears active but has virtually no content at time of checking in December 2015 see for your self as things may have changed by the time this review is posted http://www.uniquefinefoods.co.uk/ There is also a facebook group but the last post on this one is February 2015. I’m hoping the organisation is still going as they appear to have several brands. None of which I recognise but they cover a variety of interesting foods from around the world and appear to offer the service of getting new products onto the UK market.

I can’t find any current stockists but located a historic mention on Sainsbury’s with a mini review of “Good for lamb & other meats, & for vegetables. Can use in soups & stews. Interesting flavour profile that’s worth a try”

In Sainsbury’s the price was £1.60 so I’m guessing if you can still find it the price should be around there.

Flavour
(4/10)
Heat
(0/10)
Packaging
(4/10)
Value (8/10)
Overall
(4/10)

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Image from  www.kentishcobnuts.comThe Cobnut? what is it – I must admit I knew very little about Cobnuts before a visit to the Postash Farm Web site I was amazed to find out that the Cobnut is a type of cultivated hazelnut (Bit like a Bramley is a type of Apple) and during the Victorian era the UK had around 7000 acres of them in cultivation, today that has dropped to just 250 acres.

Handmade Thai Chilli Sauce with Kentish CobnutsPotash Farm grows about 6 acres of Cobnuts, made up of around 1000 trees. Their web site full of products made with Cobnuts, from Cobnut Cosmetics to Cobnut Oil, Cobnut Fudge and Biscuits.

New to the range are a couple of sauces a Smokey Roasted Pepper sauce with Kentish Cobnuts and the one we are tasting today their Thai Chilli Sauce with Kentish Cobnuts. The sauce comes in a tall 250ml bottle with a stylish minimalist label, looks just the kind of sauce you would expect in a deli.

Tipping the bottle you can see that the sauce is quite thin with flecks of the ingredients floating nicely in it, on cracking open the lid, there is a very pleasant aroma of soya sauce, ginger and garlic. The taste is subtle, this sauce is not designed to blow your socks of but enjoyed and to enhance the flavour of your meal.

Ingredients: British Sugar, Water, Cider Vinegar, Kentish Cobnuts (3%), Chillies (7%), Red Pepper, Light Soya Sauce, Garlic, Lime Juice, Ginger and Salt.

Bottle Kindly provided by Potash Farm

I had wondered if you would be able to taste the Cobnuts in this sauce with such strong flavours coming from the Garlic and Ginger let alone the chillies, but I was truly astounded as how the nutty flavour of the Cobnuts was carried by this sauce, while the heat is nothing to such hardened tasters as we have at the Chilefoundry who could probably just swig this direct from the bottle.

As a sauce to use as a dip for spring rolls or as a condiment with some jasmine rice, this sauce cannot be faulted. The great taste of a Thai Chilli Sauce, not sugary and that British twist of Kentish Cobnuts…..

You can order this on-line at their web site at £6.95 for a 250ml bottle, I wonder how well it would go with Turkey this Christmas?

Flavour
(8/10)
Heat
(1/10)
Packaging
(8/10)
Value (7/10)
Overall
(8/10)

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Lets try this Habanero based sauce with a simple ingredients list we look forward to giving our verdict and where better than to do this, yep we use Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament to give our decision on this chili sauce.

Ingredients: Red Habanero Peppers, Garlic, Vinegar, Lime & Salt.

Made & available from: Mr Saucy

Priced at: $7.95 (Price correct at time of publication)
Bottle size: 5 Fl Oz (148ml)

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Question: Summertime means one thing BBQ’s and what do you need to go with a BBQ?
Answer: A great chili sauce, so we crack open this sauce made by Mr Vikki’s named after his son ‘Harry’ it is called Harry’s Roast Chipotle BBQ Sauce so lets get it open and see how it tastes.

Ingredients: Tomato Paste, Vinegar, Roast Hickory Smoked Chipotle 14%, Molasses, Honey, Golden Syrup, Onion, Garlic, Cornflour, Salt, Soy Sauce, Mustard & Spices.

Made by & available from Mr Vikki’s

Bottle 280g Priced at £4.50 (Price correct at time of publishing)

About Mr Vikki’s: ‘A small bespoke Indian Fusion pickle producer in the beautiful Lake district Cumbria. Dedicated to using fresh natural ingredients, that contain no wheat or dairy. Many products using specific chillies, and keep very well once opened and unchilled due to the low water content achieved through ancient methods of preserving.

All recipes are unique and made by Adam Marks.’ Courtesy from http://www.mrvikkis.co.uk

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