Book Reviews

The World's Best Spicy Food - Lonely PlanetIf you are like me, I always have my eye out for new cookery books that bring me new things to try, there are a lot of repeats around at the moment and if I know what I am looking for I can find it the internet, but what I like about this book is that a lot of the recipes are for things I have not heard of before.

While some of the recipes are things I have already tried, most of them are new, at least to me. With 100 spicy recipes this book is a little gold mine. The introduction is written by Tom Parker Bowles with the recipes contributed by the likes of Daniel McCronhan, Paul Bloomfield and many other writers associated with the Lonely Planet guide books.

With the recipes coming from experts in their local areas they are pretty diverse. I loved the look of Tienlon Ho’s “Mapo Doufu” from Sichuan and Shawn Low’s Korean recipe for “Tteokbokki”, both of which are complete new to me and I doubt I would have found them with this book.

There are of course some staple recipes like Mole, Buffalo Wings, Piri-Piri Chicken, the even the UK gets a mention for Tikka Masla, Mustard and Piccalilli.

At only £14.99 from all good book shops, this a book I can recommend, I think we will all find something new to try.

Recipes & Descriptions
(9/10)
Photography
(8/10)
Design & Layout
(8/10)
Value
(10/10)
Overall
(9/10)

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Hey hey my chilli nuts!!! Cast your minds back to June of this year and you may well remember Hot Juan giving us all a heads up on a book coming out called……….

‘Dr Burnorium’s Compendium of Hot Sauces’.

Well today my friends, I have a copy sitting right here beside me.

A handy 13x19cm book which is a great size for your travels and has 40 of Dr Burnoriums favourite hot sauces from around the world. This is not, I repeat NOT!!!!!! A general book filling you with gumpf about the elegant tastes ect.

This book tells you exactly how each of the sauces behave on the taste buds. It will take you on a roller coaster of a ride through the sauces and the makers and each has its very own quirky story and comical value.

But to get into feel for the book you cannot simply go straight into reading about the sauces as I found out when I first picked it up.

You need start at the very beginning, a bit like any normal book really, pillock!! Start at the beginning and you find yourself in the depths of Dr B’s mind and from there you can fully understand and appreciate his language and terminology of the reviews. I mean come on, who the hell can come up with descriptive words for a hot sauce like, Well endowed, good girth? Or hung like a donkey? Brilliant!.

The main producers of the sauces for the book are of course the legendary Blair Lazar, Cajohn, Marie Sharp and David Ashley. A brief update on the old faithful scoville scale before hitting the hot sauce reviews and ending on some awesome recipes. A great read.

I strongly recommend this book for anybody who likes there heat and beyond. Learn about sauces like ‘Wet fart’, ‘Mad dog 357’, ‘Sphinkter srhinker’ and not forgetting the doctors very own ‘Psycho juice’.

Pick up a copy now from Amazon for I believe £9.99 or Dr Burnorium direct and you cannot go wrong. Definitely and informative book with a character of its own. Dr Burnorium  has definitely pulled out all the stops for this book. Thumbs up from me.

So remember guys, if it burns going in, it will burn coming out. Scooby out.

Flavour
(9/10)
Heat
(11/10)
Packaging
(9/10)
Value (7/10)
Overall
(9/10)

 

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This looks like a little great book for people starting out in the world of Chillies and Hot Sauces. It is the kind of book we all needed when we started, it provides a quick history of chillies, describes what makes them hot and does a good job with a guide to the main varieties and growing techniques. It is unfortunately a little US centric, I guess  we have to expect that as it is the target market for this publisher.

Angela Garbes - The Everything Hot Sauce Book

The best part of the book is recipes with over 150 to try, some are a little bit to simple, like making chilli Mayo with Mayo as the main ingredient, I would use our simple Mayo recipe instead, but apart from that they all look interesting with well written instructions, but no illustrations or pictures.

In the middle of the recipe section was a short history/guide to manufactured bottles sauces, but this only covered a few styles (Tabasco,  Sriracha, Louisiana and Mexican Hot sauces, before providing some recipes for their use.

The recipes take you from making your own hot Sauces and Pastes, to Salsas, Dry Rub and Mixes, and then on a world tour to Mexico , Texas and the Americas before  departing to Europe, African and Middle Eastern and finally Asian dishes, before covering the general subjects of Pickling and preserving and then drinks and desserts.

To make thing simple for us metric users there is a conversion guide in the back of the book, as all the recipes are in odd-looking cups and pounds..

So to sum it all up, A good book for anyone starting in Chillies, ideal gift, but a bit US centric, but still worth adding to your collection, I am sure to use the recipes as a reference guide, but it could do with some more photographs and illustrations.

Recipes & Descriptions
(7/10)
Photo/Illustrations
(2/10)
Design & Layout
(6/10)
Value
(7/10)
Overall
(6.5/10)

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the red hot chilli cookbook by Dan May

the red hot chilli cookbook by Dan May

Dan May like many entrepreneurs  in the UK chilli business has had a varied and interesting career, from touring with a band, lighting engineer to landscape photographer, Dan has travelled the UK and the rest of the world collecting culinary experiences. Based in Northumberland Dan started growing chillies as a hobby, and four years ago a new business was started “Trees Can’t Dance”, they now supply direct the the discerning chilli-head via their web site and even sell nationally through Sainsburys.

The Red Hot Chilli Cookbook is Dan’s first cook book and as you would expect from someone with such an eye for the details it is a beautifully produced with some stunning photography and page layouts. In the introduction section you get a brief history of the chilli and a guide to growing your own before we come to the best part of this book the recipes.

Here is a video that Dan made about the book for his publisher.

Each of the over 70 recipe comes with a heat rating showing one to four red chillies, a description of the dish, ingredients list and instructions, along with any tips and notes you may need. The writing style is makes for simple to follow for anyone with basic understanding of cooking and partnered with a picture of what you can expect to make, this should inspire you to cook them all.

As I read some of the recipes, I cannot wait to get back in my kitchen and try them out, the chapters are split into easily identifiable sections for soups and salads, nibbles and sharing plates, main dishes, sides dishes, sauces salsa & marinades and finally sweet things & drinks, the only problem is deciding what to start with all the recipes sound so good.

On my list to try will be the “Seriously Tasty Traditional Texas Chilli” I have a very soft spot for a good chilli and then “Creole Seafood Burritos” look stunning and finally but probably first on the list I must try “The Perfect Bloody Mary” which looks like good way to forget an afternoon.

Of course there is another excellent reason to recommend Dan’s book is that we get a mention in the Suppliers and Stockists section on page 157,  so click here to buy a copy on Amazon.co.uk .

Before I forget I must complement the photographer Peter Cassidy who’s pictures bring the recipes to life.

Recipes & Descriptions
(9.5/10)
Photography
(9/10)
Design & Layout
(9/10)
Value
(8/10)
Overall
(9/10)

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