Chillies could be used to prevent & treat diabetes and cardiovascular disease

by Hot Juan on September 4, 2009 · 0 comments

in News

At the  UTAS School of Human Life Sciences a research team is investigating the biological activity of the two active ingredients of chillies – capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin.

UTAS research fellow at the School of Human Life Sciences, Dr Kiran Ahuja, and her co-researchers are currently assessing the comparative effectiveness of chilli and aspirin on blood thinning. Hyper-aggregation of blood platelets is associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular disease.

The study will investigate what amount of chilli gives the same effect as a standard dose of aspirin on platelet aggregation and will be followed up with a dietary intervention study.

“Aspirin is commonly used to inhibit platelet aggregation, however, it has a nasty side effect, which causes stomach bleeding in patients,” Dr Ahuja said.

Dr Ahuja said it was possible that one day chillies would replace aspirin, or be combined with aspirin, as a medication for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

This work on blood coagulation follows on from Dr Ahuja’s earlier investigations that showed a potential role of chilli in prevention of diabetes and formation of fatty deposits on artery walls.

Her study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that eating a meal containing chillies lowered post-meal blood glucose and insulin concentrations. High levels of glucose and insulin are associated with an increased risk for the development of diabetes.

The School of Human Life Science also confirmed that regular consumption of chillies helps prevent the development of fatty deposits on artery walls. Dr Ahuja and her co-researchers found that chillies help reduce the oxidation of LDL-cholesterol and therefore reduces the chance of plaque formation in the arteries.

See the original press release at www.utas.edu.au

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: